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Axis Neuromonitoring Axis Neuromonitoring

When it comes to invasive surgeries, neuromonitoring provides a safety net. It allows physicians and surgeons to see how the body instantly reacts as each part of surgery takes place. This list contains many procedures where patients can benefit from neuromonitoring.

Neurosurgery

  • Skull-based Tumor Resection
  • Epilepsy
  • Fronto-temporal Tumor Resection
  • Intracranial Aneurysm Clipping
  • Intracranial Arteriovenous Malformation
  • Microvascular Cranial Nerve Decompression
  • Peripheral Nerve
  • Posterior Fossa Tumor Resection
  • Tempero-parietal Tumor Resection
  • Supratentorial Tumor Resection
  • Chiari Malformation
  • Acoustic Neuroma Resection

Orthopedic Surgery

  • Acetabular Fracture
  • Leg-Lengthening Procedure
  • External Fixation
  • Total Hip Replacement, Primary Joint Replacement with Other Risk Factors, Revision, and Reconstruction

Spine Surgery

Cervical

  • Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion
  • Cervical Corpectomy with Fusion and Instrumentation 
  • Posterior Cervical Decompression and Fusion
  • Odontoid Fracture
  • Laminoplasty

Thoracic

  • Anterior thoracic Interbody fusion and instrumentation 
  • Thoracic corpectomy with fusion and instrumentation 
  • Thoracic osteotomy
  • Thoracic laminectomy with or without fusion and instrumentation 
  • Spinal deformity correction 
  • Spinal cord tumor or AVM

Lumbar

  • Anterior lumbar Interbody Fusion or Disk replacement
  • Lumbar corpectomy with fusion and instrumentation 
  • Posterior Interbody Fusion – PLIF, TLIF
  • Posterior Lateral Fusion – Pedicle Screws
  • Lumbar laminectomy with fusion and instrumentation 
  • Spinal cord tumor or AVM 
  • Lateral (transpsoas) Interbody fusion – XLIF, DLIF, LLIF, etc.
  • All minimally invasive procedures

Sacral

  • Excision of tumor 
  • Myelomeningocele 
  • Release of tethered cord

Otolaryngology Surgery (ENT)

  • Acoustic Neuroma Resection
  • Facial Nerve Decompression
  • Glomus Tumor
  • Parotidectomy
  • Revision Mastoidectomy
  • Thyroidectomy
  • Tympano-Mastoidectomy

Interventional Radiology

  • Embolization of Cerebral and Spinal Aneurysms and Arteriovenous Malformations
  • Embolization of Traumatic Cavernous Sinus Fistula
  • Occlusion of Brain-Supplying Arteries
  • Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty
  • Spinal Angiography

Cardiothoracic/Vascular Surgery

  • Cardiopulmonary Bypass and Hypothermia
  • Correction of Coarctation
  • Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
  • Carotid Endarterectomy

Latest News

02.25.20
How artificial intelligence will affect brain surgery

Brain surgery is getting smarter. The journal Nature Medicine recently published a study that found a new imaging technique that allows pathologists to diagnose brain tumors faster and more accurately than ever before. The study focused on Invenio Imaging technology’s use of artificial intelligence (AI) in making accurate diagnoses. So, will computers replace doctors? That’s unlikely. Treating the human brain requires a human approach. But AI is poised to become an invaluable tool in improving a physician’s ability to make an accurate diagnosis, predict future issues, and come up with minimally invasive surgical plans.

02.21.20
1 in 5 Insured Hit With Surprise Bills for Surgery

TUESDAY, Feb. 11, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- You scheduled your surgery and made sure both your doctor and hospital are in your insurer's approved network of providers. Everything went without a hitch -- until a whopper of a bill showed up in the mail for "out-of-network" care during your operation. The average out-of-network surprise bill tops $2,000, a new study finds. And about 20% of patients who had surgery using a doctor and hospital considered in-network for their insurance got a surprise bill.

02.13.20
Dr. Paul Matz breaks down NASS' clinical guidelines for treatment of low back pain

The North American Spine Society published guidelines Jan. 29 for the diagnosis and treatment of low back pain in adult patients. The publication, "Evidence-Based Clinical Guidelines for Multidisciplinary Spine Care: Diagnosis and Treatment of Low Back Pain," focuses on 82 clinical questions and is the largest clinical guidelines that NASS has produced. Paul Matz, MD, a neurosurgeon with Casper-based Wyoming Neurosurgery and Spine and the evidence-based guideline development committee co-chair, spoke to Becker's Spine Review about the motivation behind the guidelines and what he hopes it will achieve.

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