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Axis Neuromonitoring Axis Neuromonitoring

AXIS Neuromonitoring provides high quality intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM). During surgery, we monitor the integrity of nerves and neurological responses along neural pathways, helping surgeons identify and protect neural structures.

Neuromonitoring 101

If your surgeon has requested neuromonitoring for your upcoming procedure, you may have questions. Find out what neuromonitoring is and how it benefits your surgery.

Will My Insurance Cover IONM?

There are many different insurance policies with varying coverages. So we’ll help you find out if yours covers IONM. Here’s what you can do to help make the process easier.

Time for Q&A

You don’t have to be an expert in neuromonitoring—that’s our job. However, we have provided some of our most commonly asked questions and their answers for you to read.

The Day of Surgery

To help prepare our patients for their upcoming surgeries, we created this short video. It illustrates the role AXIS Neuromonitoring plays the day of surgery.

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Latest News

10.23.18
Tool helps surgeons preoperatively determine readmission after spine fusion

Results of a preoperative score — the readmission after posterior spine fusion or RAPSF score — can help predict which patients are likely to require readmission after elective one- and two-level posterior lumbar fusion. Furthermore, it may help during joint decision-making to assess whether a patient is indicated for surgery or requires presurgical optimization, a presenter said.

10.17.18
Cervical, thoracic spine fractures spike, study shows — 5 findings

The incidence of cervical and thoracic spine fractures has increased, especially in white females ages 80 to 89, according to a study reported at the North American Spine Society Annual Meeting in Los Angeles, Sept. 26-29.

10.15.18
Reduced ASD incidence seen at 5 years with maintained lumbar TDR motion

LOS ANGELES — The evolution of total disc replacement prostheses over time from devices with constrained cores to ones with more mobile cores may ultimately help mitigate adjacent segment disease in patients, according to results of a post hoc analysis presented at the North American Spine Society Annual Meeting.

All News